High Efficiency Factory City Light Weight Lithium Battery Electric Bike (TDE-038B) to Lithuania Importers

High Efficiency Factory
 City Light Weight Lithium Battery Electric Bike (TDE-038B) to Lithuania Importers

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High Efficiency Factory City Light Weight Lithium Battery Electric Bike (TDE-038B) to Lithuania Importers Detail:

 

specification
Motor 250W High speed brushless DC motor
Battery 36V,10AH Li-ion battery
Charge AC 110V-240V  50/60HZ
Performance & Main components
Max.speed 25km/h (EU) or  32km/h(USA&Canada)
Tyres 26 “×1.75  city style
Front fork hydraulic suspension
Brake Fornt disk brake / Rear disk-brake
Derailleur SHIMANO,6-speed
Packaging
N.W/G.W 24.8/29 KGS
Packing size 150*26*74CM
Container capacity 96pcs/20″GP,210pcs/40″HQ

 


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High Efficiency Factory
 City Light Weight Lithium Battery Electric Bike (TDE-038B) to Lithuania Importers detail pictures


High Efficiency Factory City Light Weight Lithium Battery Electric Bike (TDE-038B) to Lithuania Importers, The product will supply to all over the world, such as: , , ,



  • English/Nat

    It’s often been said by men that women are the more deadly of the sexes – especially if they are in control of a vehicle.

    But now a driving instructor in the southern Indian city of Madras is defying years of prejudice by using novel methods to inspire other women to get on the road.

    The school is not only teaching women to ride two-wheelers. It’s also having remarkable success in building confidence.

    The mad traffic of Madras, a commuter’s nightmare, and definitely not the place for inexperienced drivers.

    Public transport in most Indian cities is generally regarded as being unable to cope with the ever rising number of passengers.

    For some women, travelling can be a nightmare.

    Interminable waits at bus-stops, endless arguments with auto-rickshaw drivers and harassment by men is a reality most women commuters are forced to live with.

    But now an end to their misery could be in sight.

    These two-wheelers, popularly called scooters, are a widely used form of transport by men all over India.

    Now this riding school in Madras aims to help women master the art.

    The force behind the school is Durga Chandrasekaran.

    Her training methods may be slightly unusual but the results are impressive — even among women who have never ridden a motorbike before and find the whole experience a little nerve-wracking.

    By placing an emphasis on confidence building, most students learn to drive the scooters within two weeks.

    Durga, who’s 38 years old, learnt to ride a scooter nine years ago after becoming disillusioned by the Indian public transport system.

    She was also able to make some money in the process.

    SOUNDBITE ( English):
    “Nowadays , office girls, housewives , college girls – women need mobility. Because of a big crowd in the buses. If they go in the buses, women harassment in the buses. So some kind of relief is needed . So I thought this is the only relief for the ladies.”
    SUPER CAPTION : Durga , women’s motorcycle instructor

    It’s not just working women who are among the students.

    Older women and housewives also seem to have decided to end their dependence on sons and spouses so they too can have more freedom of movement.

    SOUNDBITE (English):
    “My son didn’t want me driving on a scooter. He says when I am there and you have no car and I have a car and I will take you where you want. But I want to be an independent lady. And my younger son, he is in the States – he encourages me. He says you will be an American , you will be independent. So I have been learning and I have learnt it in 10
    days.”
    SUPER CAPTION : Pupil

    Durga has also helped women free themselves from some preconceived notions about scooter riding.

    Many conservative women nurse a deep sense of foreboding about riding two-wheelers and see it only as a man’s domain.

    Some feel being short may be a problem while others feel it may be difficult to drive a scooter wearing a saree ( the traditional Indian dress for women ).

    Durga’s pupils obviously think differently.

    There are nearly 600 of them riding on the busy streets of Madras, and all seem to have their sarees in place and faces brimming with confidence.

    Their new-found mobility is all set to take them places – leaving behind self-doubt and traditional male prejudice against women drivers.

    You can license this story through AP Archive: https://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/391448cc260d63d21dfba79c5c3d32e7
    Find out more about AP Archive: https://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork


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